Monday, October 26, 2015

apple pie rugelach crescents

Forgive me for sounding dramatic, but it's no exaggeration to say that my life has changed in the last year. 

I recently started back to work and new routines.  My first weeks as a working mom.  The same, but different.  It feels like walking through a stranger's footprints in the sand.  I can't match them.  My feet are twice as big.  My stride doesn't match these steps.  We will find a new rhythm. 

And it's October?!




The end of October.  Practically the holidays.

I'm thankful to be surrounded by love from friends and family to help us make this transition.  At work, I am buffered by compassion, flexibility, and generous gestures of support.  It's hard to comprehend the office kindness.  At home, Kevin stayed with baby for 2 weeks and my mom will be with him until the end of the year.  Little man will be a bit bigger, stronger before he starts daycare.  My heart can rest a beat.

But still, it's October?!

Practically the holidays.

While I was on maternity leave, I was inspired to put my twist on a traditional recipe for rugelach cookies.  They are a cream cheese dough rolled into crescents and usually filled with a combination of sugar, nuts, and raisins.  And cinnamon.  And sugar.



We love cinnamon sugar in this house.  Especially with apples.  Apple anything this time of year.  So why not apple pie flavors in a cream cheese dough?  I set to it.

Fresh apples would spill over with too much moisture on a delicate dough, so I opted for a combination of dried apples and golden raisins.  These ingredients will keep for weeks in your pantry, too, so there's less worry and hurry about when you can pull the cookies together. 


Apple pie rugelach crescents are filled with comforting holiday flavor in a new form.  They offer a little something different whatever your holiday baking traditions.  But it's the familiar rhythm you know from countless other recipes for filled and stuffed sweets:  Mix, chill, roll, sprinkle and fill, roll, bake.  Best of all, you can make the dough now, freeze it, and sprinkle, roll, and bake as an activity in the colder months.

It's the same, but different.  We are trying a new spin on familiar things.  A new stride this season.  The recipe follows.